Wednesday, August 24, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 24 - Depression & Doppelgänger

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the twenty-fourth challenge we're going to discuss your goals to success.

Here is your challenge:
You are a depressed person. You are tired with life, you are tired of the disappointment and loneliness. One night, you contemplate suicide. Before you can pull the trigger of your firearm, you are confronted by your doppelganger. The doppelganger says, “We need to talk. It is urgent.”


This is a very interesting prompt. For those who have ever been this depressed, they will understand the emotional and mental effects on their mind and be able to write a thoroughly expressive piece.

For others, you may have to do some research about depression and suicide to get the right attitudes and background to help you write.

I hope that if anyone has ever been this depressed, they seek help immediately. Go to your nearest ER and let them know what you are feeling.

If this prompt is too much and you experience triggers that cause anxiety, depressive, or panic episodes, please do not complete this writing exercise.

Proceed slowly.













Wright, Jonathan (2015-06-17). 510 Creative Writing Prompts: For Aspiring and Experienced Writers (Bundle) (p. 49).  . Kindle Edition. 

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 23 - Embarrassing Secret

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the twenty-third challenge we're going to discuss your goals to success.

Here is your challenge:
You have an embarrassing secret: you can't swallow pills. Therefore, you prefer a liquid medicine. When you visit the doctor due to illness, he hands you a cup full of pills. You asks if he has it in liquid form and he sternly says, “No. Swallow the pills.” Sweat starts spurting from your face like a garden sprinkler, especially when the cute nurse enters the room... What do you do?

This is not an uncommon issue. Many people cannot swallow pills at all, while others can take a handful and toss them in their mouth, drink a swallow of water, and easy peasy, done.

My husband used to be unable to swallow pills. At all. We got liquid medicines when we could. However, I resorted to purchasing a throat spray that helped the pills slide down. My husband even found that a problem.

So, we talked about the mental and emotional issues tied to the inability to swallow pills. Once he opened up, eventually, with some guidance, he can now take pills, even more than one at a time, by tossing them to the back of his throat and drink a good amount of water.

So, if this is an embarrassing secret you've been hiding, or you know someone who is, know that it can be overcome.

Let's get writing.









Wright, Jonathan (2015-06-17). 510 Creative Writing Prompts: For Aspiring and Experienced Writers (Bundle) (p. 21).  . Kindle Edition.


Monday, August 22, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 22 - Gardening

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the twenty-second challenge we're going to discuss gardening and how it relates to other aspects of our life.

Recently, we moved to a new community with an acre of property. I'm planting various flowers, shrubs, vines, and herbs as well as creating a fairy garden. Each flower bed will be connected to the other by paths of pine mulch. The central garden is my Zen garden. It has a "round-a-bout" made out of the pine mulch breaking off to different plant beds.

I thought today's challenge would be an interesting twist on gardening.

Here is your challenge:
Certain plants like yarrow flowers, Russian sage, and frostweed, thrive with low amounts of water and might actually die with too much. What does it mean to have too much of a good thing? Has that ever happened to you? If so, explain what occurred, and if not, what might you overindulge in and why?


How can you connect plants that die if they have too much water to over-indulging with something in your life?

Write as much as you can for about fifteen minutes. Don't edit, don't think, just write.

I wonder what you found out about yourself?












Excerpt From: Bryan Cohen. “Four Seasons of Creative Writing.” iBooks.




Sunday, August 21, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 21 - Writing a Critique

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the twenty-first challenge we're going to turn the tables and you are going to write a critique.

Critiques are similar to reviews except they address a writer rather than a potential audience; a critique explains what's working and not working to the author in an effort to help a fellow writer improve his/her work.

In a critique, you start by listing what you liked about the piece. Then, you list the areas that could be strengthened. Don't try to change the piece into what you would have done as a writer; take it for what it is.

Finally a proper critique discusses the work, not the person who created it. Your objective is to use positive, supportive language framed in the context of how the piece could be improved.

Here is your challenge:
Choose a piece of writing and compose a critique. You can use a book, short story, poem, article, or blog post. You will address the critique to the author, but you will not send it to the author. Also, your critique will discuss the work, not the person who created it. The length of your critique will depend on how long the piece of writing is and how deeply you evaluate it.

TIPS: While the focus of this exercise is to evaluate and analyze the overall content of a piece of writing, you should also look for spelling, grammar, and punctuation mistakes as well as typographical errors.

As a change of variety, you could also do this exercise using a TV show or movie, or any kind of story or art medium.

This exercise teaches you to look at a piece of writing objectively and assess it thoughtfully in an effort to consider how it might be improved. Writing critiques helps you build skills that benefit your own writing projects.

Enjoy!


Saturday, August 20, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 20 - Moral Dilemmas

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the twentith challenge we're going to dig into moral dilemmas.

It's not enough for your characters to have simple opinions. Each of us also has deeper philosophical ideals and values. Our values come from our families, religions, and cultures. They shape our morals and the decisions we make.

People are complex. What we believe is right or wrong changes when we find ourselves in real situations. Consider an honorable character who believes that one's highest loyalty is to his or her family. Then, that character learns his/her brother is a serial killer. Does he/she turn him in? Testify against him? Stories get interesting when characters' morals are put to the test.

We all know the knight in shining armor should risk his life to save the damsel in distress. If he doesn't, then he loses his status as hero and becomes a coward. What if the knight is forced to make a more difficult decision? What if his true love and his beloved sister are both in distress but he only has time to save one of them?

Here is your challenge:
For this exercise, you will put a character's morals to the test. Below, you'll find a short list of moral dilemmas. Write a scene in which a character faces one of these moral dilemmas and has to make an agonizing decision.


  • In the novel Sophie's Choice, a young Jewish mother and her two children are taken to a concentration camp. Upon arrival, she is forced to choose one child to live and one to die. If she doesn't choose, they both die. Write a scene in which your character must choose between the lives of two loved ones.
  • A single woman is close friends with the couple next door and has secret romantic feelings for the husband. She discovers that his wife is having an affair. Normally, this woman minds her own business but now she sees an opportunity to get closer to the man she wants.
  • Some countries have strict laws regarding drug possession. A family has traveled to one such country for vacation. Upon arrive (or departure), one of the teenager's bags is sniffed out by a dog. The bag is opened, the drugs are identified, and the guard asks who bag it is. Both parents are considering claiming ownership. Everyone in the family knows the sentence would be death.
  • Your character gets to travel through time and face this classic moral dilemma: The character find himself or herself holding a loaded gun, alone in a room, with a two-year-old baby Hitler.
  • A plane crashes into the sea. Most of the passengers escape with inflatable lifeboats but they do not board them correctly. Your character ends up on a lifeboat that holds eight people but there are twelve people on it, and it's sinking. Your character can either throw four people overboard and eight will survive or they will all die expect your character, who will get rescued after the others drown.




Remember, during the scene, the character should agonize over the decision and reveal his or her reasons for the choice that he or she makes.

TIPS: Search online for "lists of moral dilemmas" to get more scenarios.

If you don't want to write a scene, you can come up with more moral dilemmas of your own.

The moral dilemmas force you to put your characters in situations that are deeply distressing, thus creating conflict and tension.

Good Luck!



Friday, August 19, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 19 - Success

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the nineteenth challenge we're going to discuss your goals to success.

Here is your challenge:
What is your number one goal in life? If you do not yet have one, there’s no time like now to think about choosing one.  

TIP: Give this some thought. Try not to think of something that can be achieved immediately. Choose a goal that takes time, effort, and thought.

  • How do you plan on reaching this goal? 
  • What would happen if you achieved it? 
  • What would be the next step?

Write about your goal, why you chose it, what you are going to do to reach it, and once you do, what goal will you set next?

I hope this makes you think about setting goals and achieving them.


Thursday, August 18, 2016

August Writing Challenges: Day 18 - Superhero to the Rescue!

August. The summer is nearly over. Kids are going back to school. You now have some time on your hands.  Okay, you still have a list of chores a mile long, but let's put writing at the top of the priority list, okay?

I am going to challenge you with a writing prompt every day this month. Are you up for it? I hope so.

The writing challenges will be about a variety of topics and hopefully cause you to dig into your writing toolbox to complete with emotional skill.

Watch out, I just might throw in a fun one, well, just for fun!

For the eighteenth challenge we're going to turn you into a Superhero!

Here is your challenge:
You are a Superhero. Your special power is the ability to walk through walls, pass through solid objects, and hid inside solid materials. What is your backstory, and how did you get this special power?

Right up Avengers alley, or are you an Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.? Maybe you joined the Justice League? If you need to do research on Superheroes, go ahead. Then get as detailed as you can about your backstory, using character, plot, theme, and more to build it.

Have FUN!!